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Special Air Service (SAS) - VICTOR TWO

As outlined here, the SAS were deployed in strength during Desert Storm, 1991. A & D Squadron's Land Rover columns had driven north from Saudi Arabia into the Iraqi desert, in search of targets of opportunity. When Saddam started lobbing SCUD missiles at Israel, the SAS were re-tasked with destroying the missiles and associated infrastructure.

Towards the end of air campaign, the whole of A squadron was mustered for an attack on a Scud communications installation, code named 'Victor Two'. This site featured a large communications tower that was believed to be assisting Scud launches. A squadron were assigned the task of destroying the installation.

Under the cover of darkness, the SAS teams moved into position. The 'wagons' with the longer range weapons (mk19 grenade launcher, Milan launcher and M2 heavy machine guns) were positioned as a 'fire support group (FSG)', whilst the land rovers fitted with twin GPMGs were to act as 'close fire support group (CFSG)'. Both support groups would cover the assault teams who would move in on foot to attack the communications mast and associated buildings.

The assault teams attempted to sneak into the installation undetected but were bumped by Iraqis, the resulting gunfire alerting the whole base.

As the several hundred Iraqis engaged, the SAS realised that their intelligence reports of only a hand full of defenders where woefully inaccurate. Not deterred in the slightest, the SAS assault teams were able to plant their explosives as planned and make a fighting withdrawal, under the cover of fire from the 110s. The next morning, the SAS put in a reconnaissance mission which confirmed that the masts had been destroyed.

All in all it was a classic SAS operation, harking back to the desert raids of WW2. Despite all the fire coming their way, no SAS men had been injured and the objective had been achieved.

« SAS operations

Related Book :

Sabre Squadron
by Cameron Spence

Spence was a SAS Land Rover commander and part of an A Squadron fighting column during the 1st Gulf War. Operating behind Iraqi lines, Spence's column hunted Scuds, took Iraqi prisoners and participated in the attack on the Victor Two communications centre.

Sabre Squadron goes into great detail and the reader gets a good insight into Special Air Service procedures and operations in the desert during Desert Storm.

A fantastic read.

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